Statistics on dating violence

(Liz Claiborne, Teen Research Unlimited Survey, released July 2008)A study of public high school students in New York City found females who recently experienced dating violence and males who experienced sexual assault some time in their lives are more likely to report suicide attempts than their counterparts without similar histories of violence.

Teens report an even higher occurrence of abusive dating behaviors including physical, sexual, tech, verbal or controlling abuse; the most common abusive behavior experience is controlling behavior (47%), physical/sexual (29%) and tech (24%). Threats of suicide or self-harm is the leading reason why a college student who is an abused partner stays in the relationship (24%).The next most common reasons are afraid of losing friends (20%) and dependent on abuser financially (12%). Conducted by Knowledge Networks, (December 2010), “College Dating Violence and Abuse Poll”.Adolescent girls who reported dating violence were 60 percent more likely to report one or more suicide attempts in the past year, the survey found, and males who reported sexual assault were four times as likely to have attempted suicide.A history of sexual assault in females and a history of dating violence in males did not increase the rates of attempted suicide, which is the third leading cause of death for adolescents.Kids are most likely to talk about it with their friends rather than their parents, so if you are a parent make sure to read these articles about Children and Teen violence.

43% of college women report experiencing abusive dating behaviors including physical, sexual, tech, verbal or controlling abuse; the most common abusive behavior experience is controlling behavior (32%), physical (22%) and sexual (22%). Conducted by Knowledge Networks, (December 2010), “College Dating Violence and Abuse Poll”. Conducted by Tru Insight, (June 2009), “Teen Dating Abuse Report”.

For many violent teens, it’s what they know from seeing domestic violence in their parents’ relationships, and it transfers into the relationships they start developing as young adults.

Part of the work of Family Safety Center of Memphis and Shelby County is to spread awareness and education about domestic violence, including teen dating violence, throughout our community.

Significant numbers of teens (15-18) are experiencing emotional and mental abuse as well as violence in their dating relationships; this is even more prevalent among teens that have had sex by the age of 14. commissioned Teenage Research Unlimited (TRU) to conduct quantitative research among tweens (ages 11-14), parents of tweens, and teens (ages 15-18) who have been in a relationship.

The research pertained to young dating relationships and the presence/absence of sexual activity and abusive behaviors.

Just Say YES speakers are dedicated to reducing these numbers through presenting ways of effectively addressing boundaries in dating, refusal skills, and establishing a positive circle of friends.